Tuesday 5 – Sunday 17 March 2013                                         11.00am – 6.00pm

gallery@Oxo
Oxo Tower Wharf
Barge House St
South Bank
London SE1 9PH

Admission free

Visit the website for more details

The Asahi Shimbun and Mitsubishi Corporation will co-host The Great East Japan Earthquake Press Photo Exhibition in London from Tuesday 5 until Sunday 17 March. The exhibition was held in three Asian cities during 2012: Bangkok, Jakarta and Seoul. Now, the 2013 exhibition marks the second anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake, offering an opportunity to both remember the earthquake and tsunami that devastated the Tohoku region and gain a sense of the progress made towards recovery. The exhibition will also be held simultaneously in Paris and Hanoi.

Two years on from the destruction caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake, the affected areas of the Tohoku region are steadily working towards recovery. The messages of support and practical assistance received from people around the world have been welcomed and put to good use in the areas affected, ensuring that today the region continues to improve thanks to generous cooperation and global collaboration.

But exactly what happened that day? What has happened since? And how have the areas affected begun to recover? The exhibition is intended to remind London of the terrible events of two years ago, to encourage them to turn their thoughts again to the Tohoku region and provide visitors with an opportunity to chart the progress made towards recovery.

It will be open to the general public from Tuesday 5 March.

Organisers:

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday 30 March 2013                             7.30pm

The Cockpit
Gateforth Street
London NW8 8EH

Tickets £7 (£6 for students)

To buy tickets visit the website

Okuni was the founder of Kabuki theatre in 16th century Japan. Gathering up the female outcasts and misfits, particularly those involved in prostitution, Okuni gave them direction, teaching them acting, dancing and singing skills in order to form her troupe.

Okuni’s troupe was exclusively female. Thus, she required her actors to play both male and female roles. In 1629, due to public outcry for moral reform, those under the shogun Tokugawa Iemitsu forbade women from performing in kabuki. The role of Kabuki drama was transferred to men and has remained as such to this day.

In this new Kabuki performance, incorporating contemporary dance, song and drama, Akiko Ono reworks the story of Kabuki’s female founder.

Directed and choreographed - Akiko Ono
Script - Noriko Yokoi (based on the book “Izumono Okuni” by Sawako Ariyoshi)
Program  - Steve Newman
Assistant & performer - Sayaka Taki
Performers - Zac Nizato, Takeshi Matsutmoto, Azzurra Caccetta, Tomoko Komura, Alexander Luttley and more
Music – Akira Kawai

For further information visit the Akiko Dance Project website

 

Friday 8 March 2013                     6.30pm

SOAS Main Building
Room G52
School of Oriental and African Studies
University of London
Thornhaugh Street
Russell Square
London WC1H 0XG

Admission free (no booking required)

Performance
Akira Matsui’s shimai the kiri section of “Matsukaze”
Moderator  - Dr David Hughes

Noh 能
Originating in the 14th Century, Noh is a highly stylized masked song and dance drama in which beauty of voice and movement are the highest aims. Noh themes and dramaturgy are extremely simple. The crescendo of single emotion is presented by means of spatial composition and music. Subjects handled include filial piety, love, jealousy, revenge and samurai spirit. The scripts often not only lack a coherent plot, but even purposefully avoid usual dramatic contrasts and development.Features of this operatic dance drama include the main role’s use of a mask, and the orchestra, which comprises a large hand drum (o-tsuzumi), a small hand drum (ko-tsuzumi), a traverse flute (fue), and sometimes a stick drum(taiko).

Matsukaze (Pine Wind)
This is one of best-loved plays in the repertoire. The shite, depicting the ghost of a local woman wears a ko-omote mask. The play was apparently created by Zeami, drawing partly on existing variants. Ariwara no Yukihira (818-93) a court noble and a poet, like his famed brother Narihira, spent several years in a picturesque fishing village on Suma Bay (near modern Kobe) enjoying the country life. This play supposes that, while there, he became intimate with the peasant salt-maker Matsukaze and her sister. Eventually he returned to the Capital, promising of course to see them again – but it was not to be. Now centuries later, the sisters’ ghosts pine for their former lover. A traveling priest (as in so many Noh plays) encounters the sisters, who relate their tale and reveal that their spirits cannot break free from their painful memories and attachments to earthly desires.Matsukaze dances her grief, asking the priest to say a prayer for her peace in the other world. But – as in so many plays – was it all just a dream?

Further information
Riko Sherratt  e-mail: kuragetouni@gmail.com Tel. 020 8993 9505
Dr. David Hughes  e-mail: dh6@soas.ac.uk

 

 

Wednesday 24 April 2013                                         9.00am

Elizabeth Gate Entrance (see below for directions)
Royal Botanic Gardens
KewRichmond
Greater London TW9 3AE

£10.00 for Japan Society members and their guests
(Price includes breakfast, special tour and day pass)

Booking deadline – Wednesday 17 April
Limited places. Please book early to avoid disappointment.

Japan Society members are being offered a rare opportunity to visit Kew’s valuable collection of bonsai trees in the company of resident expert, Richard Kernick.

Assembling at the Elizabeth Gate Entrance at 9.00am (see below for directions), guests will proceed to Kew Garden’s Orangery for a private breakfast, including coffee, tea, freshly squeezed juice and pastries. An introduction to the Kew Foundation’s current projects will be given during breakfast.

Following this, guests will be divided into two groups. The first group will be led to the glass house containing the bonsai collection for a tour lasting approximately one hour. The second group will be free to roam the gardens until 11.00am, when they are asked to assemble at the glass house to begin their own tour.

All attendees will be granted complimentary guest passes allowing them access to Kew’s extensive grounds for the rest of the day.

Programme

Directions to the Elizabeth Gate Entrance to Kew Gardens can be downloaded here (PDF). Please ensure you arrive promptly – the gardens are not open to the public at this time and guests will need to be escorted to the Orangery.

9.00am All guests assemble outside the Elizabeth Gate Entrance to Kew Gardens.

9.15am Breakfast in the Orangery.

10.00am First tour group departs for the bonsai glasshouse. Other guests may wander the gardens at leisure.

11.00am Second tour group meet outside the glasshouse.

12.00 – 6.30pm Guests are free to remain at Kew and explore the gardens until closing.

Richard Kernick has now been caring for the Bonsai collection at Kew for eight years, having been employed as their first Bonsai Specialist in 2004.  Coming from a ‘hobbyist’ background, he continues to maintain his own personal collection of trees, some of which have been in his possession for almost 20 years.  Whilst working at Kew it has been his pleasure to work extensively with Nobuyuki Kajiwara, an acknowledged expert in the field of bonsai growing.

In partnership with:

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday 9 March – Saturday 6 April 2013

Leach Pottery
Higher Stennack
St. Ives
Cornwall TR26 2HE

Opening Hours (March – October)
Monday – Saturday        10.00am – 5.00pm (last entries to museum 4.30pm)
Sunday                                11.00am – 4.00pm (last entries to museum 3.30pm)

Featuring pots by Shigeyoshi Ichino including works by friends and colleagues – John Bedding and Jeff Oestreich

All Works for Sale

To mark the 5th anniversary of its reopening, the Leach Pottery is planning a memorial exhibition for former Leach potter, Shigeyoshi Ichino who died in June 2011. The exhibition will consist of pots sent from Japan by his widow Shigeko Ichino, and friends Jeff Oestriech and John Bedding who worked with him during his time the Leach Pottery from 1969 to 1973.

Bernard and Janet Leach were introduced to Tanso Ichino – Shigeyoshi’s father – by Shoji Hamada in the early 1950’s whilst visiting the ancient pottery town of Tachqui in the Tamba district of Japan. Janet Leach went on to study pottery for two years under Tanso and from this she formed a lasting friendship with the family. In later years Janet promised Tanso that when he was ready she would bring over his eldest son Shigeoshi (Shigey) to study English style pottery at the Leach. She fulfilled this promised when in 1969, wide eyed, Shigey arrived in St Ives, to stay for three and a half years. He adjusted well into the workshop and social life of St Ives, even joining the local darts team. He had brought with him his traditional style Tamba wheel; a beautifully made momentum wheel, and along with his tools, and alien techniques he was a continual influence on the other Leach students. He in turn learnt many decorating techniques and western styling that were not natural to his rural pottery background, and these were to stay with him throughout his career.

Shigey was also instrumental in bringing back into service the climbing kiln which had for some years been neglected in favour of a less labour intensive oil kiln. He wanted to use the last chamber for wood firing using traditional Tamba-Yaki firing techniques. This was more instruction for the Leach students and evidence of the value of what Bernard liked to call the East West exchange.

The traditional Tamba kilns of Tachquie are multi chambered naborigama and the Ichino kiln is a typical example; a seven chambered horizontal chimney rising up a steep slope like a natural form in the landscape.  Fired solely by wood it takes great skill to fire, and produces ware of distinctive quality. When Shigey returned to Japan to take over the family pottery, he used the influences he had gained from his time at the Leach and his travels in Europe, and combined this with local materials and traditional Tamba techniques, to produce work that was distinctive from other Japanese potters.

Over the years he was given regular solo shows in some of the most prestigious department stores in Japan these were often sell-outs. In 1981 he exhibited with Janet Leach in London at the Amalgam Gallery and after being appointed lecturer at the National Hyogo University in 1988 he was invited to exhibit in Dundee by the city as part of the Japanese Fair.

In 1978 the circle of exchange was completed when Shigey invited John Bedding to spend a year of study at his family pottery. John and Shigey had become friends at the Leach, and had also worked together in France when John left to work with Jean Tessier. Both John and another friend and college of Shigey’s from the Leach days; the American potter Jeff Oestriech, wanted to mark the death of their friend by including work of their own as a symbolic gesture to the part of Shigey’s life that was the ethos of the Leach Pottery “The Bridge Between East and West”.

For further information, please visit the Leach Pottery website

 

 

 

Wednesday 6 March 2013          12.00pm – 2.00pm

GSMA Head Office
Seventh Floor
5 New Street Square
New Fetter Lane
London  EC4A 3BF

Free – to register visit the website

On the eve of the two-year anniversary of the triple earthquake, tsunami and nuclear power crisis that struck North-Eastern Japan, Internews Europe is publishing a study on the role that communications played in disaster recovery and response. Report author Lois Appleby will present her main findings before a debate with a panel of humanitarian experts and emergency responders.

Panelists:

Noriyuki Shikata
Minister, Head of Political Section
Embassy of Japan in the UK
Fmr. Deputy Cabinet Secretary for Public Affairs Prime Minister’s Office, Great East Japan Earthquake

Dr. Randolph Kent
Director of Humanitarian Futures Programme
King’s College London
Internews Europe Board Member

Lois Appleby
Report Author (on secondment from DFID, Conflict Humanitarian and Security Department)

Masahiko Konno
Technical Director, Radio Ishinomaki
(Ishinomaki city, Miyagi)

Representative from Google Japan
TBC

Moderator:

Mark Harvey
Executive Director, Internews Europe

 

Supported by:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday 16 March 2013                                                            11.00am – 4.30pm

SOAS Room G52
University of London
Thornhaugh Street
Russell Square
London WC1H 0XG

Free admission but places are limited.
To book or for information, email dh6@soas.ac.uk

Abeya will offer a free workshop in Japanese folk singing, dancing and related instruments. Those attending will be able to try out several different aspects of the tradition.

This workshop is part of a series. Abeya will be staging two concerts and a workshop in the UK this March. See other event listings for further details.

For further information, visit the website.

Supported by:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday 13 March 2013                7.30pm

Durham University Music School
Durham University
Palace Green
Durham DH1 3RL

Tickets £10, Students £4, Under 18s £1

To book your place in advance, call 0191 332 4041 (Gala Theatre, Durham)
To buy tickets at door from 6.45pm, cheque or cash only

Four young members of the multi-award-winning Japanese folk music group Abeya provide a stunning mix of song, dance, drumming, bamboo flutes, and the powerful, addictive 3-string tsugaru-jamisen. Abeya’s diverse repertoire ranges across highly ornamented ballads, dance songs, lullabies and work songs. The group has been praised for their ability to enchant audiences not only with their talent but also their highly engaging approach using humour, interaction, and poignant explanations to help make the music relevant to international audiences. Audience participation will be expected!

This concert is part of a series. Abeya will be staging two concerts and a workshop in the UK this March – see other event listings for further details.

For further information, visit the website.

Supported by:

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday 10 April – Saturday 27 April 2013          7.30pm
(performances Monday – Saturday)

The Bussey Building
133 Rye Lane
London SE15 4ST

£10 per ticket

To buy tickets, please visit the website
(a limited number of tickets can also be bought 1 hour before the show)

The statue Fudo Myo-o is stolen from auction at Sotheby’s. Or was it stolen from Japan? The British Museum are up in arms and Patricia MacBurney is sent to Japan to smooth over the cracks. Reporter, Aisha Pinkerton is thrust into the middle of this whirlwind political episode to cover the statue’s travels, furthering her own career whilst neglecting her own fatherless children, who search for him behind her back. Meanwhile, Tomoko Hara is determined to get the sacred statue back to its rightful owner.

New play Shōnagon is based on the Japanese gentle woman Sei Shōnagon and her writings in her pillow book. A pillow book is a form of diary that the gentle women would write their daily accounts in, as well as poetry and other things.

Sei Shōnagon wrote her Pillow book about the year 1002 CE – coincidentally the year that is usually ascribed to the first complete manuscript of Beowulf. Synchronicity, that series of coincidences that we are usually too unaware of to acknowledge, has shaped our production. The contemporary story weaved into the fabric of Shōnagon’s own work has been formed by world events and by the direct personal experiences of company members. Now in 2013, it is up to the new cast to bring to life all of Shōnagon’s words as well as those who have contributed to make this modern pillow book.

Over the research and rehearsal period, patterns have emerged out of the sometimes startling collision of  the cast and director’s ideas with authentic incidents. The meaning of these patterns, like the koans or riddles of Zazen Buddhism are still emerging and consequently this is very much an evolving performance piece.

For further information, visit the website or Facebook page

 

Friday 15 March 2013          7.00pm

Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre
SOAS

University of London
Thornhaugh Street
Russell Square
London WC1H 0XG

Free admission – no booking available (Please arrive around 6.30 to ensure a seat at this special event.)

Four young members of the multi-award-winning Japanese folk music group Abeya provide a stunning mix of song, dance, drumming, bamboo flutes, and the powerful, addictive 3-string tsugaru-jamisen. Abeya’s diverse repertoire ranges across highly ornamented ballads, dance songs, lullabies and work songs. The group has been praised for their ability to enchant audiences not only with their talent but also their highly engaging approach using humour, interaction, and poignant explanations to help make the music relevant to international audiences. Audience participation will be expected!

This concert is part of a series. Abeya will be staging two concerts and a workshop in the UK this March. See other event listings for further details.

For further information, visit the website.

Supported by:

 

 

 

 

 
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