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The Japan Society Review

The Japan Society Review is published on a bimonthly basis, both online and printed (members are entitled to receive a copy by post). Since the starting of the publication in 2006, each issue covers a selection of Japan-related books and films, as well as theatre and stage productions, tv series and exhibitions. Its purpose is to inform, entertain and encourage readers to explore the works for themselves.

The Japan Society Review is possible thanks to the work of volunteers who dedicated their time and expertise to help us to promote the learning and understanding of Japanese culture and society.

Issue 42 (December 2012, Volume 7, Number 6)

Issues (PDF)

Issue 42 (December 2012, Volume 7, Number 6)

In this last issue of 2012, we look at Susan Meehan and the discussion with author Kazuo Ishiguro. Then, Tim Holm rediscovers a pilgrimmage made by the maverick Japanese photographer Daido Moriyama in the early 1970s, applying his photographic chiaroscuro to a tour of Tono in North-Eastern Japan. Another highlight of our December issue is Sir Hugh’s exploration of a famous potter’s first love in The Etchings of Bernard Leach.

Issue 41 (October 2012, Volume 7, Number 5)

Issues (PDF)

Issue 41 (October 2012, Volume 7, Number 5)

This issue focuses on the young people of Japanese society through the eyes of both foreigners and the Japanese themselves.

Issue 40 (August 2012, Volume 7, Number 4)

Issues (PDF)

Issue 40 (August 2012, Volume 7, Number 4)

In this issue we focus on various aspects of the Japanese movie industry with some stimulating reviews of recent books.

Issue 39 (June 2012, Volume 7, Number 3)

Issues (PDF)

Issue 39 (June 2012, Volume 7, Number 3)

In this issue we focus on the Meiji era, which spanned the period September 1868 to July 1912.

Issue 38 (April 2012, Volume 7, Number 2)

Issues (PDF)

Issue 38 (April 2012, Volume 7, Number 2)

To mark the first year anniversary of the devastating 11 March 2011 Tohoku Earthquake, now also known as the Great East Japan Earthquake, we devote this issue to looking at its aftermath.

Issue 37 (February 2012, Volume 7, Number 1)

Issues (PDF)

Issue 37 (February 2012, Volume 7, Number 1)

In this issue we focus on crime and the legal system in Japan.

Issue 36 (December 2011, Volume 6, Number 6)

Issues (PDF)

Issue 36 (December 2011, Volume 6, Number 6)

In this issue we focus on pioneers and adventurers who opened Japan up to the wider world. Susan Meehan kicks off with a gripping new work by Roger Pulvers on Lafcadio Hearn, the great Japan chronicler of the 1890s who captured the essence of traditional Japan before it morphed into its modern form. Michael Sullivan looks at Giles Milton’s Samurai William: The Adventurer Who Unlocked Japan which charts the life of the first Englishman to learn about and live in Japan.

Issue 35 (October 2011, Volume 6, Number 5)

Issues (PDF)

Issue 35 (October 2011, Volume 6, Number 5)

In this issue we delve into the murky world of Japanese politics focusing on one of the pivotal contemporary figures in the nation’s ever changing political landscape, Ichiro Ozawa. In four reviews, we look at Ozawa’s astonishing career and driving philosophy. Moving away from political machinations, Susan Meehan examines a disturbing and grim movie about the underside of the Japanese police.

Issue 34 (August 2011, Volume 6, Number 4)

Issues (PDF)

Issue 34 (August 2011, Volume 6, Number 4)

In this issue we explore Japan’s involvement in Manchuria with four reviews looking at books covering different aspects of this period and its bitter aftermath. Fumiko Halloran looks at a book on the plight of Japanese prisoners of war who were captured by the Soviets in Manchuria. Moving away from Manchuria, Susan Meehan [...]

Issue 33 (June 2011, Volume 6, Number 3)

Issues (PDF)

Issue 33 (June 2011, Volume 6, Number 3)

In this issue we focus on Japanese religious thought, philosophy and ideology, covering Japan’s two main religions (Buddhism and Shinto) as well as Christianity and some lesser known ideologies. Sir Hugh Cortazzi examines the ideology surrounding the tea ceremony which is explored by Tim Cross in a thought-provoking new study. Ben-Ami Shillony [...]