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The Japan Society Review

The Japan Society Review is published on a bimonthly basis, both online and printed (members are entitled to receive a copy by post). Since the starting of the publication in 2006, each issue covers a selection of Japan-related books and films, as well as theatre and stage productions, tv series and exhibitions. Its purpose is to inform, entertain and encourage readers to explore the works for themselves.

The Japan Society Review is possible thanks to the work of volunteers who dedicated their time and expertise to help us to promote the learning and understanding of Japanese culture and society.

Issue 95 (October 2021, Volume 16, Number 5)

Issues (PDF)

Issue 95 (October 2021, Volume 16, Number 5)

Welcome to another exciting issue of The Japan Society Review bringing you five reviews of books, stage productions and films about Japan. This October issue is more eclectic than ever and we are thankful to our reviewers for their time and expertise.

Heaven by Mieko Kawakami: Live

Theatre & Stage

Heaven by Mieko Kawakami: Live

Staged by Jack McNamara An immersive reading performance of Mieko Kawakami's new novel, "Heaven", a work about bullying, what it means to bully, and to be bullied. Review by Laurence Green

Queer Japan

Films & Series

Queer Japan

Directed by Graham Kolbeins Queer Japan, directed by Graham Kolbeins in 2019, is a documentary which explores the LGBTQ+ community in Japan offering an illustrative view of the queer culture in the country. Review by Jenni Schofield

The Shikoku Pilgrimage: Japan’s Sacred Trail

Books

The Shikoku Pilgrimage: Japan’s Sacred Trail

By John Lander The Shikoku Pilgrimage is one of the most important pilgrimage routes in Japan. Connected by eighty-eight temples across the four prefectures of Shikoku, this 1,200 km trail is associated with Buddhist monk Kukai (Kobo Daishi), the founder of Shingon Buddhism. Review by Jess Cope

37 Seconds

Films & Series

37 Seconds

Written and directed by Hikari 37 Seconds explores the coming-of-age story of Yuma, a woman with cerebral palsy, and her quest to become more independent from her overbearing mother. Review by Jenni Schofield

monk: Light and Shadow on the Philosopher's Path

Books

monk: Light and Shadow on the Philosopher's Path

By Imai Yoshihiro This book is a chef monograph, where, through food writing – a blend of personal essays and photographs revolving around food and nature, concluding with a number of recipes – Imai Yoshihiro tells the story of his fourteen-seated wood-fire pizza restaurant. Review by Riyoko Shibe

Monkey Man

Books

Monkey Man

By Ichikawa Takuji In 'Monkey Man', Ichikawa Takuji, one of Japan’s most imaginative, bestselling and unusual authors, pointedly challenges readers to consider how we can change the inevitable course of history and save the human race from itself. Review by Laurence Green

Plum Blossom & Green Willow: Japanese surimono prints from the Ashmolean Museum

Books

Plum Blossom & Green Willow: Japanese surimono prints from the Ashmolean Museum

By Hanaoka Kiyoko and Clare Pollard This book introduces over forty surimono in the collection of the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford and provides readers with an insight into the refined and cultivated Japanese literati culture of the early nineteenth century. Review by Fiona Collins

British Extraterritoriality in Korea, 1884-1910: A comparison with Japan

Books

British Extraterritoriality in Korea, 1884-1910: A comparison with Japan

By Christopher Roberts Filling an important gap in extraterritoriality studies and in the history of Anglo-Korean relations, this benchmark study examines Britain's exercise of extraterritorial rights in Korea from 1884 until Korea's formal annexation by Japan in 1910. Review by Kimura Genki

Issue 94 (August 2021, Volume 16, Number 4)

Issues (PDF)

Issue 94 (August 2021, Volume 16, Number 4)

The August issue of The Japan Society Review presents five reviews that cover a diverse spread of media and topics related to Japan. The opening review explores a two-volume academic work focusing on public diplomacy, human rights, and modern slavery in Japan and the US.